Wednesday’s Child: Jonathon

Posted by Heather Sewell on January 15, 2014  /   Posted in Adoption, Adoption Support, Advocacy, Foster Care

Jonathanjpg

JONATHON, 14,  is a Science guy; that is to say, he is interested in everything that is going on around him, from bugs and butterflies to snow storms and tornadoes. He does well in school and is fascinated by the study of astronomy.

Jonathon is always full of questions. He adores his teachers and has friends at school. Jonathon likes to ride his bike and play basketball… again spending time outside.

He will do great with an adoptive parent who will advocate for him and assist him with making continued academic progress. Jonathon would thrive with an adoptive parent who will focus on him, guide him, and share pride in his achievements. Jonathon requires what every child needs, the unconditional love of a family.

Jonathon’s Video

To adopt a child from foster care, please contact SNAP for more information.

SNAP is the Special Needs Adoption Program in the Department for Community Based Services that operates statewide to recruit families to adopt and/or foster Kentucky’s waiting children.

HOW DO I GET STARTED? 

If you are reading this, you have started! It is that easy to begin your adoption quest.

Just call any of the Adoption staff at 1-800-928-4303 or 1-800-432-9346. Staff at these numbers can collect your contact information and mail you an informational packet about the foster care and adoption program provided by the Cabinet. Staff will be able to provide you with a name and phone number in your local area so that you may register for an informational meeting (which is the first step to becoming an approved adoptive home).  Click here to view the 9 Steps to being approved flyer.

Right now, more than 300 Kentucky children are living in foster homes, group homes, and residential centers, waiting for adoptive families. They're not the babies many of us think of when we think of adoption.

Right now, more than 300 Kentucky children are living in foster homes, group homes, and residential centers, waiting for adoptive families. They’re not the babies many of us think of when we think of adoption.

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